Research reveals the devastating effects domestic violence has on pregnant women, and their unborn children….

According to recent studies, a staggering 45% of abused women report that they are forced to have sex with their partner. When pregnancy results in an abusive relationship, in 50-70% of women the abuse continues during pregnancy. The National Institutes of Health reports that over 300,000 pregnant women in the U.S. are victims to domestic violence, with domestic violence being the leading cause of death among U.S. women of childbearing age.

I am one of these women the statistics speak of. I understand, firsthand, the horror of becoming pregnant as a result of abuse, and then enduring a pregnancy in a home where I did not feel safe. 

Pregnancy journal.. while other mothers are scrap booking the milestones of their pregnancy from the first pink line on the pregnancy test to hearing a steady heart beat for the first time, these are my sad milestones….

Common symptoms announced pregnancy –nausea, fatigue, sudden weight gain… and cravings for pickles. On the outside I looked like any pregnant woman but behind closed doors, I lived a life of fear and uncertainty, as an abuse victim.

4/5 Months Pregnant, while I was celebrating the first kicks – my abusive ex was calling me fat, and telling me I looked like “an old granny” in maternity clothes. I attempted to squeeze into jeans even as my belly stretched, and baby kicked in protest to avoid his angry outbursts… and secretly hoped baby did not hear what was said.

6/7 months Pregnant, while I am eagerly awaiting the arrival of my child, preparing a nursery, reading baby books and shopping for clothing and toys (tears in my eyes, goofy grin on my face) – my abusive ex is giving the baby the “silent treatment”. He has ignored every aspect of my pregnancy, and acts as if we are not expecting a baby. There is no emotion. No talk of the pregnancy. No planning. I feel like a single parent before the baby is even born.

8/9 months Pregnant, still working a job to support the family, finances are stretched thin… my abusive ex is addicted to prescription pain pills. While I am planning my trip to the hospital to delivery the baby, he is planning his next visit to the ER or to the dentist or to a round of doctors to get his next fix.

“..to think of all the babies whose pre-birth experience is one of fear and threat. I have worked with women for many years that have lived with domestic violence and other abuse it made me feel immensely sad for them and their unborn children..” ~ Laura Schuerwegen, author the blog, Authentic Parenting

Unborn children are harmed by domestic violence that they are exposed to in the womb, research confirms what many domestic violence victims and advocates have reported.

Exposure to domestic violence begins in utero, as does the harm it causes. Beginning in the 2nd trimester of pregnancy, babies can hear voices and sounds from the world around them. The clearest sound heard is the mother’s voice. What to Expect: Fetal Sense of Hearing offers a simple experiment to give you the chance to understand what noise sounds like to an unborn baby, “Try this for fun (really!): Put your hand over your mouth. Have your partner do the same. Then carry on a conversation – and that’s what voices sound like to your baby in the womb.

The louder a sound the more likely a baby is to hear it, which includes yelling or threats directed at a pregnant mother, the sound of crying or police sirens – all common in experiences of domestic violence.

Before birth, a unborn baby is not only hearing but experiencing the very emotions of fear – through the chemical process that happens in the mother’s body. Chemical processes in the mother’s body send emotional and physical messages to the unborn baby. A mother who is frightened, anxious or hyper vigilant as a result of abuse has higher levels of stress hormones in her body, that will also affect the developing baby; and over time will put extra stress on the brain and body (this is also reaffirmed by the ACEs study which says toxic stress damages the function and structure of a child’s developing brain, and can lead to other health consequences). In particular, the hormone cortisol is neurotoxic and has damaging effects on the brain, and may contribute to emotional problems in a baby after birth, says new research by Michigan State University scientists.

Other risks to the pregnant mother and unborn baby include: physical injury, inability to seek medical care or treatment, less access to support/friends/family and a higher rate of miscarriage.

To be clear – the problem is NOT the expectant mother but the abuse inflicted on the mother, at the hands of an abusive partner. By gaining a better understanding of how abuse affects unborn children, Alytia Levendosky, a study co-author at Michigan State is hopeful that increased education and awareness about domestic violence will send a strong message that domestic violence is harmful to unborn babies, and will encourage doctors and other medical professionals, and social workers, to screen and monitor for violence; and better be able to support victims – or provide needed resources for help. Research has proven that advocacy for abuse victims, in combination with providing resources for help, does improve outcomes.

A positive note – children’s brain can heal and create new connections; so early intervention can lessen some of the damage caused by domestic violence; and may also save a life.

Need Help? The National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-7233 | 1-800-787-3224 (TTY)

Additional Reading: 

ACES = Adverse Childhood Experiences

Authentic Parenting: Effects of Pre-Birth Trauma on the Unborn Child

DOMESTIC ABUSE MAY AFFECT CHILDREN IN WOMB

The effects of domestic violence on unborn children (Includes a list of how exposure to domestic violence negatively impacts the emotional, physical and social development of children)

Partner violence during pregnancy: prevalence, effects, screening, and management

NCADV Pregnancy and Domestic Violence Facts

When Pregnancy Triggers Violence

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I had a redaer request faith based domestic violence resources, this is what I could find online. Please check the source for accuracy.

If anyone knows of any church or spiritual resources, please post!

National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1.800.799.SAFE (7233) 1.800.787.3224 (TTY)
Anonymous & Confidential Help 24/7.http://www.ndvh.org/

CALIFORNIA:
Shalom Bayit: Ending Domestic Violence in Jewish Homes (for teens & adults). Oakland, CA:http://www.shalom-bayit.org/

FLORIDA:
St. Rita Ministry, (Domestic Violence Resource Ministry at Holy Family Catholic Church, Orlando FL:http://saintritaministry.catholicweb.com/

Vida Nueva Christian Reformed Church of Miami Lakes, Fla offers domestic violence support group:http://www.thebanner.org/magazine/article.cfm?article_id=2238

ILLINOIS: Focus Ministries, Elmhurst. Support Groups, Prayer, Education/Training, Newsletter, Resources. :http://www.focusministries1.org/

MICHIGAN: Looking For My Sister, Oak Park. Spiritual Counseling, Support Groups, Transitional Housing, Education/Training, Youth Programs. http://www.lookingformysister.org

MINNESOTA:

The Dwelling Place St. Paul: Christian-Based Transitional Housing, Support Groups, Counseling & Bible Studies/Prayer Ministry: :http://www.thedwellingplaceshelter.org/

Hiding, Hurt Healing, Biblically based support group for women who have been abused and are seeking to rebuild their lives: http://www.hidinghurtinghealing.com/

MONTANA: Blackfeet Domestic Abuse Program, Browning. Reduce domestic violence on Blackfeet reservation includes a 13-week structured program for abusers that will be provided in lieu of jail, with a major focus on developing participants’ cultural identity and tribal values.
Blackfeet Domestic Abuse Program
Blackfeet Tribe
Browning, MT 59417
406-338-2933

VIRGINIA: Bethany House, Alexandria (Shelter and Support).
Domestic Violence Helpline: 703-658-9500: http://www.bhnv.org/index.html

WASHINGTON D.C. METRO AREA: Ayuda (for children and adults) offers holistic, multi-lingual legal and social assistance for low-income immigrants in the areas of immigration, human trafficking, domestic violence and sexual assault: http://www.ayudainc.org

OTHER RESOURCES:

Domestic Violence Prevention & Education in Faith-Based Communities (Interfaith, Islam, Christianity and Judiasm included)::http://new.vawnet.org/category/Main_Doc.php?docid=837

Spiritual Sude of Domestic Violence, Biblical Perspective on Domestic Violence: http://www.spiritual-side-of-domestic-violence.org//

How to Start a Christian Support Group in Your Community: :
http://heartshealing.org/startagroup.html/

“churches can make the goal of ending domestic abuse a prominent part of their ministry…Standing together, churches can become powerful first-responder networks that help create zero tolerance for intimate partner and dating violence throughout the communities they serve. First, pastors and their teams must learn to recognize the signs and, then, how to address domestic abuse without jeopardizing the abused person’s safety.” Domestic Violence and the Church (What churches can to stop domestic violence & support families):http://www.eagles-wings-ministry.com/dv-church.html